song/word noises

“I will dance, I will sing, I will go mad for my king. I will be even more undignified than this.”

The funny thing about contemporary christian music is that some songs tend to have lyrics that sounds very unsound.

Yeah, I like that tune. Man, that riff was catchy! And among all that nice-sounding song/word noises, it’s easy for us to overlook the meaning of song lyrics.

For an example, the quote above is taken from the song “Undignified” by David Crowder Band. Now, I don’t mean to bash on David Crowder; I personally have been encouraged & edified from his musical ministering to people. However, this particular song did stand out because it involved people going “mad” & being undignified for God!

Yes, that is biblical; we can see King David’s example in 2 Samuel 6 where he leaped and danced with all his might! However, David maintained that “it was before the LORD” that he made merry.

However, back to David Crowder’s “Undignified”, do people really meditate about this biblical context while they are singing this song? Or are we just singing songs just for the sake of singing songs? Is it too much to ask for thoughtfulness in what we do, even in what we sing? What is driving us as we sing songs of praise?

That was just a mild example. Here’s an extreme example.

“I want your ugly, I want your disease, I want your everything as long as it’s free, I want your love.”

This is from Lady Gaga’s Bad Romance. Now, I must admit to everyone here that I actually like Lady Gaga’s music. She’s quite a talented individual and her tunes are catchy.

However, it”s not advisable to let Lady Gaga be the absolute definer of significant concepts such as “love.”

What can she possibly be insinuating by asking for EVERYTHING as long as it’s free?

This type of thinking gets people sick and dead. Don’t pull that “love is unconditional” card on this song; there’s nothing “unconditional” & redeeming about the message of Bad Romance. So you want all of me, but as long as it is unconditionally free? There, she just placed a condition on what it takes to fulfill her desire for your love; in order to have Lady Gaga desire your love, you have to give everything for free including ugly and disease. That seems contradictory to me. It’s saying “To have my conditional love, I want your unconditional love.”

I want your ugly… your disease? Really now?

You know what comes to mind when I hear that line? Premarital sex & AIDS & death come into mind. We have a song that extols immoral behavior & asking for all its nastiness,  while in other parts of the world, we have people dying because of this notion of “Bad Romance love” seeping into people.

Really now? How much more diseased can this get?

The point: Beneath all the song/word noises, there is meaning that we must discern & decide if it’s even worth junking our ears with it.

+Michael K {in process of deleting Bad Romance}

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2 thoughts on “song/word noises

  1. Mm. I think it’s because NIV says, in II Samuel 6:21-22, “David said to Michal, ‘It was before the LORD, who chose me rather than your father or anyone from his house when he appointed me ruler over the LORD’s people Israel—I will celebrate before the LORD. I will become even more undignified than this, and I will be humiliated in my own eyes. But by these slave girls you spoke of, I will be held in honor.’ ”

    In ESV, II Samuel 6:21-22 is “And David said to Michal, ‘It was before the LORD, who chose me above your father and above all his house, to appoint me as prince over Israel, the people of the LORD—and I will make merry before the LORD. I will make myself yet more contemptible than this, and I will be abased in your eyes. But by the female servants of whom you have spoken, by them I shall be held in honor.'”

    So ESV uses the word “contemptible” instead of the NIV use of “undignified.” Perhaps David Crowder is using NIV instead of ESV? 😛 Haha. I only know this, because my class sang this for praise once and we referenced from NIV. But please correct me if I am still mistaken.

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